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1 month ago

Southern Beaches Landcare Coastcare

Feast your eyes on an echidna train...this time of year echidnas are courting. From now until the end of September, echidnas will be moving across the landscape, seeking lurv ... a number of males will follow a female and the one with most perseverance will likely succeed. You may see them crossing farms, fields, gardens and, most treacherous of all, roads. Here are some important tips from Remedios Linden (https://www.facebook.com/groups/415211698950674/?hc_location=ufi) on what to do when you see a wandering echidna and how to keep them safe from harm. Echidnas follow an individualised scent trail with which they mark and find important locations such as their nesting burrow and familiar range. For this reason, an echidna on the move must not be picked up and relocated. Moving and relocating an echidna could ultimately cause it’s death as it will be in a foreign range without markers as to its food sources, it’s nesting burrow and its other significant points of reference. This is especially important if the echidna is a female with a nest young. Baby echidnas - called puggles - spend the first 50 days of their lives in their mother’s (very rudimentary) pouch, then they remain in a nesting burrow while the mother goes foraging for food (from October to January). They can be left for up to 5 days but if you move or relocate a female she may not be able to find her way back to the burrow - meaning certain death for the puggle, and most likely the mother. When you see an echidna on the move, let it move in its own time and at its own pace. If the echidna is on the road, bring your vehicle to a stop and put your hazard lights on. Do your best to safely alert other drivers about the presence and location of the echidna and indicate to them that they need to stop and wait also. Let it cross in the direction it was headed. If you find an echidna in your garden, take in pets and kids and let it move on.They are no threat at all to you, but when alarmed or threatened it will dig itself into the ground, only emerging when it senses the threat has gone. NEVER attempt to try and dig out an echidna. You may injure them. Let them emerge and move on themselves. If you find an injured echidna it needs immediate vet assistance. If you can transport it, cover it with a very thick blanket or towel, lift and place in a sturdy container such as a strong box or pet carrier. If you can't call your local wildlife rescue group. Note where you have picked it up from. If you find a deceased echidna, it’s vital to stop and check it’s underside for a pouch and the possibility of a puggle. If a live puggle is in the pouch, call your local wildlife rescue group ASAP for advice and assistance. Thanks to Remedios Linden for info. Photo from stroudcommunityweb.com ... See MoreSee Less

 

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Izzy Sillar

2 months ago

Southern Beaches Landcare Coastcare

Add some Poas to your garden - the butterflies will thank you! And you'll be doing your bit to bring back native grasses to our landscapes. Did you know that at least 26 Australian butterfly species use tussock grasses as their host plant? ... See MoreSee Less

3 months ago

Southern Beaches Landcare Coastcare

On behalf of all past and present Landcarers around Tasmania, we send a big heartfelt thanks to Bob Hawke for his vision in starting the 'Decade of Landcare' in 1989. Bob was a leader of Landcare whose belief in what the grass roots community is capable of achieving has persisted and continues to grow to this day. Our sympathies go to those close to Bob, who have reason to both mourn his passing and celebrate his legacy. Photo credit Australia National University . . Australian Labor Party #BobHawke #LandcareTasmania #Landcare #auspol #Community #Conservation #TonyBurke ... See MoreSee Less

 

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Fiona H Strahan landcare too! I was quite young when Bob was PM but am learning so much in his passing 🌈

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