News

Comments Box SVG iconsUsed for the like, share, comment, and reaction icons

Facebook Posts

WORLD WETLANDS DAY - FEBRUARY 2ND, 2020
Up to 400 visitors came to the Lauderdale Primary School hall to enjoy everything from facepainting and puppet making to some cracking science talks and walks at the recent 2020 World Wetlands Day event. Highlights included tours of wetlands, bird watching at Ralph's Bay and a walk around the Roscommon constructed wetlands with Professor Jamie Kirkpatrick. Stalls promoting wetland conservation offered people an opportunity to chat informally with scientists and experts and for those seeking a more in depth wetlands experience, the fast and funky talks were a popular choice. Great music, good food, art and science kept both adults and kids engaged and entertained, many for the entire day. A terrific free Clarence Council event and a wonderful opportunity to celebrate Tasmania's special wetland places! Thanks to Mayor Doug Chipman for opening the event and Aunty Colleen Mundy and Aunty Cheryl Mundy for the Welcome - always a special experience.
... See MoreSee Less

Another successful pop up clean up! On Wed 15th January seven volunteers spent a very productive two hours at the Dodges Ferry Skate Park. Jessie Smith saw an opportunity to clean out the waterhole while it’s almost dry. Joined by George, Stella, Gary, Alison, Glenn and Gwen - all wearing gloves and using pick up tools - the team found skateboard, scooter and bicycle parts, broken glass, a scooter, soft drink and beer bottles, plastic bags, shoes, coins, two pairs of scissors, deodorant and a broken windscreen! They also cut and removed the seed heads from the weedy Cumbungi and cut all the new and old stems, Glenn took some home for garden mulch.

Next up, Jessie has organised a clean up at Okines Beach and Lagoon Park on the other side of the school for Clean Up Australia Day - more details soon ☀️
... See MoreSee Less

Another successful pop up clean up! On Wed 15th January seven volunteers spent a very productive two hours at the Dodges Ferry Skate Park. Jessie Smith saw an opportunity to clean out the waterhole while it’s almost dry. Joined by George, Stella, Gary, Alison, Glenn and Gwen - all wearing gloves and using pick up tools - the team found skateboard, scooter and bicycle parts, broken glass, a scooter, soft drink and beer bottles, plastic bags, shoes, coins, two pairs of scissors, deodorant and a broken windscreen! They also cut and removed the seed heads from the weedy Cumbungi and cut all the new and old stems, Glenn took some home for garden mulch. 

Next up, Jessie has organised a clean up at Okines Beach and Lagoon Park on the other side of the school for Clean Up Australia Day - more details soon ☀️Image attachmentImage attachment

Comment on Facebook

Great effort,thanks to all 🙂

Great work

Don't miss this opportunity to have your say!
Sorell Council survey for Open Space Strategy

Following the discussion at a community consultation in Dodges Ferry and acting on our feedback, the consultants developing an Open Space Strategy for Sorell Council have amended their survey to include questions which give you the opportunity to comment on the natural values of our community owned open spaces.

We need to identify the publicly owned bush reserves, road sides, walkways and coastal areas that we love and that make Southern Beaches so special. Council need to hear what people value about these places and how we believe they should be managed.

You can complete the survey online by following this link:
www.surveymonkey.com/r/SG25KZY
Note: check out the questions before opening the online survey as it requests addresses and other information you may need to have on hand when completing the survey.

The survey closes on December 20th
... See MoreSee Less

Dont miss this opportunity to have your say! 
Sorell Council survey for Open Space Strategy

Following the discussion at a community consultation in Dodges Ferry and acting on our feedback, the consultants developing an Open Space Strategy for Sorell Council have amended their survey to include questions which give you the opportunity to comment on the natural values of our community owned open spaces. 

We need to identify the publicly owned bush reserves, road sides, walkways and coastal areas that we love and that make Southern Beaches so special. Council need to hear what people value about these places and how we believe they should be managed.

You can complete the survey online by following this link:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/SG25KZY 
Note: check out the questions before opening the online survey as it requests addresses and other information you may need to have on hand when completing the survey.

The survey closes on December 20thImage attachment

COMMUNITY CONSULTATION - OUR OPEN SPACES THIS SATURDAY 16th NOVEMBER
Okines Community House 3.30 - 5.00pm
Sorell Council is running this community engagement sesion on Saturday to hear our ideas on the future of public open space facilities and walkways in our area. There will be a 30 minute presentation followed by an informal workshop and feedback session. This is a great opportunity to discuss how important these pockets of native bushland and open spaces are to our community, our lifestyle and local wildlife. Come along and have your say!OPEN SPACE STRATEGY
A reminder that the community consultation sessions for the development of the Strategy begin this week! The sessions kick off tomorrow night at 6.30pm at Copping Hall. www.sorell.tas.gov.au/open-space-strategy/
... See MoreSee Less

COMMUNITY CONSULTATION - OUR OPEN SPACES THIS SATURDAY 16th NOVEMBER
Okines Community House 3.30 - 5.00pm 
Sorell Council is running this community engagement sesion on Saturday to hear our ideas on the future of public open space facilities and walkways in our area. There will be a 30 minute presentation followed by an informal workshop and feedback session. This is a great opportunity to discuss how important these pockets of native bushland and open spaces are to our community, our lifestyle and local wildlife. Come along and have your say!

Feast your eyes on an echidna train...this time of year echidnas are courting. From now until the end of September, echidnas will be moving across the landscape, seeking lurv ... a number of males will follow a female and the one with most perseverance will likely succeed. You may see them crossing farms, fields, gardens and, most treacherous of all, roads.
Here are some important tips from Remedios Linden (www.facebook.com/groups/415211698950674/?hc_location=ufi) on what to do when you see a wandering echidna and how to keep them safe from harm.

Echidnas follow an individualised scent trail with which they mark and find important locations such as their nesting burrow and familiar range.
For this reason, an echidna on the move must not be picked up and relocated.

Moving and relocating an echidna could ultimately cause it’s death as it will be in a foreign range without markers as to its food sources, it’s nesting burrow and its other significant points of reference. This is especially important if the echidna is a female with a nest young. Baby echidnas - called puggles - spend the first 50 days of their lives in their mother’s (very rudimentary) pouch, then they remain in a nesting burrow while the mother goes foraging for food (from October to January). They can be left for up to 5 days but if you move or relocate a female she may not be able to find her way back to the burrow - meaning certain death for the puggle, and most likely the mother.

When you see an echidna on the move, let it move in its own time and at its own pace. If the echidna is on the road, bring your vehicle to a stop and put your hazard lights on.
Do your best to safely alert other drivers about the presence and location of the echidna and indicate to them that they need to stop and wait also. Let it cross in the direction it was headed.
If you find an echidna in your garden, take in pets and kids and let it move on.They are no threat at all to you, but when alarmed or threatened it will dig itself into the ground, only emerging when it senses the threat has gone.

NEVER attempt to try and dig out an echidna. You may injure them. Let them emerge and move on themselves.

If you find an injured echidna it needs immediate vet assistance. If you can transport it, cover it with a very thick blanket or towel, lift and place in a sturdy container such as a strong box or pet carrier. If you can't call your local wildlife rescue group. Note where you have picked it up from.

If you find a deceased echidna, it’s vital to stop and check it’s underside for a pouch and the possibility of a puggle.
If a live puggle is in the pouch, call your local wildlife rescue group ASAP for advice and assistance.

Thanks to Remedios Linden for info. Photo from stroudcommunityweb.com
... See MoreSee Less

Load more

Comments are closed.